Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Whisper on the Wind

    BOOK REVIEW:   Belgium, 1916.   The German Imperial Army may have conquered Belgium on its march through Europe, but it can't crush their spirit. An underground newspaper surfaces to keep patriotism alive and bring hope and real news of the war to the occupied country. It may be a whisper among the shouts of the German army, but it's a thorn in their side nonetheless, and Edward Kirkland will do anything to keep it in print---even risk his life.
    Isa Lassone's family fled Europe at the first rumblings of war. Now, two years later, she sneaks back across enemy lines, determined to rescue Edward---the man she has loved from afar since she was a child. But will he ever see her as more than the wealthy, silly girl his mother once cared for as a daughter?
    When Edward refuses to leave, so does Isa, and soon she is drawn into his dangerous double life. As the Germans close in, Edward realizes he's put more at risk than he'd planned. . . . .especially the beautiful, smart, yet obstinate young woman who has inconveniently managed to work her way into his life---and into his heart.

    MY REVIEW:   Have you ever wondered at the power we give words? Nothing but mere words on paper can keep us up at night, perched on the edge of our chairs, frantically biting nails to see what happens next. Humorously exaggerated picture, yes, but some books are like that---we can't wait to see what's on the next page.
    I wouldn't say this book was quite in that category, but it came close. The story was written well and kept one interested, but something was just a bit off, like it needed an extra stitch of something.
    If I were able to change one thing in this book, I would have Isa gone for closer to five years. Leaving at 16 and arriving at 18 just doesn't seem long enough to "grow up" as much as Isa thinks she has. I think 14 to 18 would be more realistic. But really, there wasn't anything big I could see needing changed, just a few minute details here and there.
    I don't read a lot about the World Wars, I guess because I prefer to read about happier times. I see a book set in those times and automatically look for a different one. But for whatever reason, I read this one. And I'm glad I did.
    I will say, the ending of the book disappointed me a little. So many things are left rather hanging. Oh, nothing serious, but enough to make a person wonder. Did so and so ever meet? Were these people conspiring together? Was this person a spy? Who was the spy? What happened directly afterwards for the main characters? Etc.
    Whisper on the Wind is the second book in Maureen Lang's GREAT WAR SERIES, the first book being Look to the East and the third being Springtime of the Spirit. I haven't read either of the others, but hope to before too long. This book didn't seem to need an accompaniment, but maybe after reading the others I'll change my mind. :)

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